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Randy Smoot is a probation officer in the Clark County Juvenile Court.

Brandon Sipes is program coordinator for Nazarene Compassionate Ministries.

Prompted by the police shootings in Tulsa and Charlotte, on this episode of Voices In My Head we discuss the problems of racism in America, both explicit and subtle. We talk about things like white privilege, racial fatigue, racial violence, being a parent of black children in America, an imbalance of power and more.

Our hope is that conversations like these will happen more and more. Racism will not just go away by pretending it isn’t there or hoping it disappears. We are all guilty of prejudice and often by being silent we make the problem worse. This is our attempt at not being silent. We must not allow our fear of saying the wrong thing keep us from having the conversation.

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Pray with us as we continue to edit this video and are making preparations for its release. This is a great reminder from Moody Radio Studios. I pray it for this music video as well. “Your song may be used to save a soul. Sing it prayerfully.”

We appreciate any help you are able to give on our GoFundMe page, no matter how small or large. To God be the glory

Blessings,
Rick Lee James

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www.GoFundMe.com/RickLeeJames

 

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My guest on this episode of Voices In My Head is Jonathan Cain. Jonathan is the longtime keyboardist and rhythm guitarist in the internationally acclaimed rock band Journey. He’s also the co-writer of the No. 1 digital catalog song in history, “Don’t Stop Believin’,” as well as writer of “Faithfully” and co-writer of “Who’s Crying Now,” “Open Arms” and many more international hit songs. Jonathan will release his new solo album, What God Wants to Hear, on Oct. 21 on Identity Records with The Fuel Music distribution.

 

Also:

Rick Lee James making a music video on September 23rd and I’m requesting three things from the listeners of Voices in My Head:

1.) Prayer

2.) Financial Support

3.) Your Prayerfully Imaginative Ideas for the video

Our hope is to portray that while we are in the midst of great brokenness, and longing that we hopefully look to the great mystery of our faith Christ has died, Christ Is Risen, and that Christ is Coming Back again.

Listen to this 20 minute episode and then visit GoFundMe.com/RickLeeJames to find out how you can help make this video a reality.

Rick Lee James Album Reviews:

CCM

“Crafted directly from inspiration found in hymnals and prayer books, songwriter and worship leader Rick Lee James offers Hymns, Prayers and Invitations. It is with the intentionality behind the last word of the album title, Invitations, that makes this project a stand out. More than a collection of hymny interpretations or simple song book upgrades, James’ purposeful use of lyric, timbre, and track synchronism should lead the listener into moments of powerful communication and worship with the Lord. Hymns, Prayers and Invitations drip with soundtracks of Sunday morning sanctuaries to intimately personal prayer closet concerts.”

Worship-Leader-Mag

“The modern hymn approach to congregational songwriting and singing has a worthy new addition”

Under The Radar

“If you’re looking for music that is congregational yet not cookie cutter, get this album”

Pare booking

Click To Contact Pare Booking


NEWS

Worship Leader Magazine Song DISCovery

Christ Is Lord (Christ Before Me), the first single from my album “Hymns, Prayers, and Invitations” is featured in the September/October 2016 release of Worship Leader’s Song DISCovery. Be watching https://songdiscovery.com/ in September and October for more information.

National Worship Leader Conference 2016 in Kansas City

Worship Leader Magazine has invited me to be part of the National Worship Leader Conference in Kansas City, October 5th-6th. If you are going to be there, please come and say hello. I look forward to being a guest at what I’m sure is going to be an amazing event. I’m grateful to Worship Leader Magazine for extending an invitation.

 

Get Music Music By Rick Lee James

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Listen To This Show on iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/voices-in-my-head/id494097807?mt=2

 

You’ve heard his music on tv shows like Parenthood, Suits, Nashville, The Hills, and Jimmy Kimmel Live. You’ve heard his songs performed by artists like Kelly Clarkson, Johnny Lang, Mat Kearney, Brandon Heath, and Point of Grace just to name a few. Now you get to hear him in this episode of Voices In My Head, the official Podcast of Rick Lee James. We are so happy to welcome phenomenal singer and songwriter Michael Logen to the show this week.

Get Music and More From Michael Logen at his web site:

Michael Logen’s Official Web Site: www.MichaelLogen.com

 

 

 

Get Music Music By Rick Lee James

“I stand at the front door of the church. It is Sunday. I like to stand here and watch people entering the church. What unites them? Sinners come in the church. Some are still in their mother’s arms. Sleeping, they come, but not of their own volition. They look innocent enough, but they are still sinners. Though outwardly cuddly and cute, they are among the most narcissistic and self-centered in the congregation. When they wake up, they will cry out, not caring that the rest of us are about important religious business. When they are hungry, they will demand to be fed, now. Cute, bundled up, placidly sleeping or peevishly screaming. Sinners. Sinners come to church. They are being led by the hand. They do not come willingly. Though they put up a fight an hour ago, a rule is a rule, and there they are. They have said that they hate church. They have said things about church that you wouldn’t be allowed to have published in the local newspaper, if you were older. Ten years old they are, and they lack experience and expertise, but not in one area: they are sinners. Sinners come in the church. Sullen, slouched, downcast eyes. They were out with friends last night to a late hour, and the incongruity between here in the morning and there last night is striking. They know it and it is only one of the reasons why they do not want to be here. Dirty thoughts. Desire. Things you are not supposed to think about. These thoughts make these sinners very uncomfortable at church. Sinners come to church, and they have put on some weight, middle-aged, receding hairlines, “showing some age.” They are holding on tight. Well-dressed, attempting to look very respectable, proper. Youthful indiscretions tucked away, put behind them, does anybody here know? A couple of things tucked away from the gaze of the IRS. And a night that wasn’t supposed to happen two conventions ago. These sinners are looking over their shoulders. They are having trouble keeping things together. Maybe that is why there are so many of these sinners here, coming in the door of the church. Sinners come in the church, and the doors at last are closed. The last of them scurry to their appointed seats. The organ music begins, played by an extremely talented, incredibly gifted artist, who is also a sinner. And the lyrics to that first hymn, something about “Amazing Grace,” sung, appropriately, by those who really need it, need it in the worst way. They sing in the singular, but it ought to be in the plural. “Amazing grace that saved wretches like us.” Sinners come into church. And now for the chief of them all, the one most richly dressed, most covered up, the one who leads, and does most of the talking. Some call him pastor. Down deep, his primary designation is none other than that of those whom he serves. Sinners come into the church, and now their pastor welcomes them, their pastor, the one who on a regular basis presumes to speak up for God, making him the “chief of sinners.” Sinners come to church, all decked out, all dressed up, all clean and hopeful. Sinners, sinners hear the good news, “Christ Jesus came into the world to save sinners” (1 Timothy 1: 15). Jesus called as his disciples Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John, Mary and Mary Magdalene. Sinners. Only sinners. And Jesus got into the worst sort of trouble for eating and drinking with sinners. Only sinners. Sinners. Jesus saves sinners. Thank God. Only sinners. We sinners.”

From The Best of William Willimon: Acting Up In The Name of Jesus